Tag: 3D printing

Wounded Eagle Gets New 3D Printed Beak

Wounded Eagle Gets New 3D Printed Beak

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After being shot in the face by a poacher seven years ago, Beauty the bald eagle lost most of her beak. Without it, she couldn't feed herself, and likely would have died in the wild. But now, Beauty's getting a second chance at survival in the form of a 3D printed beak. A team of researchers, engineers and dentists created the world's first prosthetic beak, which was modeled with CAD software and 3D-printed from nylon polymers. After a two-hour-long procedure, Beauty can now eat and drink by herself, though she's not ready to be released back into the wild. The eagle remains at Birds of Prey Northwest, the conservation facility that spearheaded the recovery project. For more on Beauty and her 3D printed beak, check out the video above, and tell us what you think in the comments.Read m...
How 3D Scanning Brought ‘BioShock Infinite’ to Life

How 3D Scanning Brought ‘BioShock Infinite’ to Life

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When Irrational Games needed to create a distinctive look to promote the female lead in the video game BioShock Infinite, it looked to 3D scanning rather than traditional modeling software. The game's leading lady, Elizabeth Comstock, is one of the most original and engaging digital characters in years, and her realistic appearance in a commercial for the game revealed how effectively the technology can convey facial features and emotions. Elizabeth's in-game design came from a traditional combination of motion-capture for her body and 3D modeling for her face, but Irrational needed a face for Elizabeth in the promotional materials — billboards, print and online ads and even TV spots. As the game neared its release in March, Irrational knew that Elizabeth would have to grab the audience's
The Power Of Technology: Doctors Use 3D-Printed Heart To Save Toddler’s Life

The Power Of Technology: Doctors Use 3D-Printed Heart To Save Toddler’s Life

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An infant born with congenital heart defects is in good health thanks to a 3D-printed heart. Doctors at New York’s Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital used technology to save the sick 2-year-old during a July surgery. Before the procedure, the team printed a copy of the baby’s complicated heart and used the plastic model to plan a surgical “road map” to get the organ working. In the past, surgeons would have had to make split-second decisions on the operating table. But now that they can discuss plans in a calm setting without the immediate stress of life and death, they’re more likely to have successful procedures. The baby was born with a malformed heart. Instead of functioning chambers, he had a maze-like organ that contained severa